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Monday, April 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of Local court, provincial society, and justice in the Ottoman Empire found in the catalog.

Local court, provincial society, and justice in the Ottoman Empire

Boğaç A. Ergene

Local court, provincial society, and justice in the Ottoman Empire

legal practice and dispute resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu (1652-1744)

by Boğaç A. Ergene

  • 74 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Brill in Leiden, Boston, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Justice, Administration of -- Turkey -- History -- 17th century.,
  • Justice, Administration of -- Turkey -- History -- 18th century.,
  • Turkey -- History -- Ottoman Empire, 1288-1918.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [221]-229) and index.

    Statementby Boğaç A. Ergene.
    SeriesStudies in Islamic law and society -- v.17
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKKX283
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 236 p. :
    Number of Pages236
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22047985M
    ISBN 109004126090

    However, for the Sultans of the Ottoman Empire, justice was the ultimate duty of the monarch, and Islamic law was a tool of legitimation and governance. James E. Baldwin examines how the interplay of these two conceptions of Islamic law – religious scholarship and royal justice – undergirded legal practice in Cairo, the largest and richest. The analysis of the local court and Aintaban provincial society is embedded in a broader historical context, namely, the effects of the expansion of the Ottoman Empire into the Middle East.   The theme of the essays, organized by chronology, revolve around the relationship between law, legality, and legitimacy in the Ottoman Empire and modern Turkish state, with a particular view to correcting the simplified misperception of Ottoman legal practice popularized by sociologist Max Weber (d. ).


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Local court, provincial society, and justice in the Ottoman Empire by Boğaç A. Ergene Download PDF EPUB FB2

: Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Cankiri and Kastamonu () (Studies in Islamic Law and Society) (): Ergene, Bogaç a: BooksAuthor: Bogaç a Ergene. Get this from a library. Local court, provincial society, and justice in the Ottoman Empire: legal practice and dispute resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu ().

[Boğaç A Ergene]. Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire This book also sheds light on the costs of court usage and reveals alternative sites for dispute resolution that existed independently of the courts. political and administrative history of the Ottoman Empire, legal anthropology and comparative by: Get this from a library.

Local court, provincial society, and justice in the Ottoman Empire: legal practice and dispute resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu (). [Boğaç A Ergene] -- This work covers the functions of Islamic courts within the framework of the late 17th- and early 18th-century Ottoman provincial administration, and explores the process of adjudication and.

Boğaç A. Ergene received his Ph.D. degree from the Ohio State University in He is a Professor of History at the University of Vermont. Ergene is the author of Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire (Brill, ) and co-author of The Economics of Ottoman Justice (Cambridge University Press, ) and Halal Food: A History (Oxford.

The Empire also experienced major political-administrative restructuring and socioeconomic transformations. In the context of this tumultuous change, The Economics of Ottoman Justice examines Ottoman legal practices and the sharia court's operations to reflect on the judicial system and provincial : Metin Coşgel.

Müderris is a term that described the religious scholar, professor or faculty member in the Seljuk's world and the Ottoman Empire. In Arabic, the word "müderris" means teacher of lesson, describing the teacher who teaches and the scholar who is authorized to give completing the education and training in the local schools of the provinces, and after having.

Boga. Ergene: Local Court, Provincial Society and Jus tice in the Ottoman Empire, Legal Practice and Dis pute Resolution in?ankir. and Kastamonu ( ). Studies in Islamic Law and Society, vol Brill, Leiden, ISBN This study on two towns in seventeenth-eighteenth century Anatolia comes as.

A kadi (Arabic: قاضي ‎ qāḍī; Turkish: kadı) was an official in the Ottoman term kadi refers to judges who preside over matters in accordance with Islamic law, but in the Ottoman Empire, the kadi also became a crucial part of the central authority's administrative hierarchy.

After Mehmed II codified his kanun, kadis relied on this dynastic secular law, local customs. The Empire also experienced major political-administrative restructuring and socioeconomic transformations. In the context of this tumultuous change, The Economics of Ottoman Justice examines Ottoman legal practices and the sharia court's operations to reflect on the judicial system and provincial by: 2.

examines Ottoman legal practices and the sharia court Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire (). Other titles in the series are listed at the back of the book.

Cambridge University Press — The Economics of Ottoman Justice. Bogaf Ergene's Local Court, Provincial Society and And justice in the Ottoman Empire book in the Ottoman Empire is a slight expansion of his dissertation, which won MESA's Malcolm H. Kerr Dissertation Award in the Humanities in Called a "path-breaking thesis," it was commended for its "highly original argument" based on.

He is the author of Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire (Brill, ) and editor of Judicial Practice: Institutions and Agents in the Islamic World (Brill, ). His most recent monograph, The Economics of Ottoman Justice, coauthored with Metin Coşgel, is forthcoming from the Cambridge University Press.

Peirce Morality Tales 89; Ginio, “The administration of criminal justice,”, ; Boğaç Ergene, Local Court, Provincial Society, and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu Author: Omri Paz.

Review of the hardback:‘This book adds an important new dimension to the historiography of Ottoman Egypt. The author makes very intelligent use of Ottoman administrative documents and Muslim court records from a variety of Egyptian locales in order to situate this critical region within the new cutting-edge scholarship on the role of the environment and natural resource Cited by:   This comparative and broad-ranging book spans three centuries of Ottoman history.

It offers a new interpretation of the relations between the central Ottoman empire and provincial Iraqi society in the early modern period, and demonstrates that, contrary to the accepted view, their military, fiscal and political links strenghtened rather than weakened over /5(4).

Ergene is the author of Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu (–) (Boston and Leiden: Brill, ) and editor of Judicial Practice: Institutions and Agents in the Islamic World (Leiden and Boston: Brill, ).

Ergene is the author of Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu (–) (Boston and Leiden: Brill, ) and editor of Judicial Practice: Institutions and Agents in the Islamic World (Leiden and Boston: Brill, ).

In addition, he has published. Ergene is the author of Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu () (Boston and Leiden: Brill.

State and Provincial Society in the Ottoman Empire by Dina Rizk Khoury,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(3). The analysis of the local court and Aintaban provincial society is embedded in a broader his‐ torical context, namely, the effects of the expan‐ sion of the Ottoman Empire into the Middle East.

In mid-sixteenth-century Aintab, the local court constituted a setting within which Ottoman state officials and the people of Aintab, a province that. Food trucks announcing halal proliferate in many urban areas but how many non-Muslims know what this means, other than cheap lunch.

Here Middle Eastern historians Febe Armanios and Bogac Ergene provide an accessible introduction to halal (permissible) food in the Islamic tradition, exploring what halal food means to Muslims and how its legal and cultural.

The Economics of Ottoman Justice by Metin Cosgel,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.4/5(1). Local court, provincial society and justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal practice and dispute resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu, Leiden: Brill.

Encyclopaedia of IslamAuthor: James E. Baldwin. About Bogac Ergene: Bogac Ergene is Professor of History at the University of Vermont. He’s an expert on Islamic legal practice in the Ottoman Empire and is the author of "Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire" as well as co-author of "The Economics of Ottoman Justice: Settlement and Trial in the Sharia Courts".

Local Court Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Local Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu. Leiden: Brill. Google ScholarAuthor: Yavuz Aykan, Boğaç Ergene. Boğaç A. Ergene, Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu (), Leiden-Boston: Brill, (published in International Journal of Middle East Studies, 39/3 [], ).

Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of History, Ohio State University. Local Court, Provincial Society, and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çakırı and. The economics of Ottoman justice: settlement and trial in the Sharia courts Coşgel, Metin, Ergene, Boğaç A.

"The Economics of Ottoman Justice examines Ottoman legal practices and the Sharia court's operations to reflect on the judicial system and provincial relationships.".

The introduction is a brilliant defense of interdisciplinary co-authorship and is worth a read for any economic historian, whether or not she is interested in the Ottoman Empire.

The core of the book primarily presents and analyzes the data, with a few chapters dedicated to presenting the historical context (i.e., the history of Kastamonu. Carter V. Findley, “The Evolution of the System of Provincial Administration as Viewed from the Center,” in Palestine in the Late Ottoman Period: Political, Social, and Economic Transformation, ed.

David Kushner (Jerusalem: Yad Yizhak Ben-Zvi; Leiden: E.J. Brill, ), 4–The provincial laws are often presented in scholarship as yet another example of the impact of the West, or Author: Avi Rubin. Boğaç Ergene is Associate Professor of History at University of Vermont and Aga Khan Visiting Professor in Islamic Humanities at Brown University (Spring ).

He is the author of Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Cankiri and Kastamonu ().He also published articles in International.

The Ottoman Empire was governed by different sets of laws during its existence. The Kanun, a secular legal system, co-existed with religious law or Hanafi school of Islamic jurisprudence. [1] [2] Legal administration in the Ottoman Empire was part of a larger scheme of balancing central and local authority.

[3] Ottoman power revolved crucially around the administration of the rights to. Ergene is a professor of history at the University of Vermont. In addition to his book with Armanios, he is the author of “Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu ()”.

Review of Boğaç Ergene, Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu, Baldwin, J.,In: Arab Studies Journal. p. 4 p. Research output: Contribution to journal › Book/Film/Article review. Cover: Burhan Karkoutly, Untitled, circaCourtesy of owner Saleh Barakat 2.

FOUNDER/EDITOR The History of the Ottoman Empire Boğaç A. Ergene Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu (). Dina Rizk Khoury's book, which spans three centuries of Ottoman history, offers an interpretation of relations between the central Ottoman empire and the frontier city of Mosul during the early modern period.

Basing her work on Ottoman and Iraqi archival sources, the author demonstrates that, contrary to the accepted view, the links between the central state and provincial social.

Local Court, Provincial Society and Justice in the Ottoman Empire: Legal Practice and Dispute Resolution in Çankırı and Kastamonu ().

Boston and Leiden: Brill, Publications - Peer-Reviewed Academic Articles and Book Chapters: “Introduction: National Socialism and the Holocaust in the Middle East and North Africa” (with. Law and Legality in the Ottoman Empire and Republic of Turkey Kent F. Schull, M. Safa Saraçoğlu, Robert F.

Zens (eds.) The editors of this volume have gathered leading scholars on the Ottoman Empire and the Republic of Turkey to chronologically examine the sweep and variety of sociolegal projects being carried in the region.

Therefore, Dursun Fakih was the first qadi, or judge, in Ottoman history. The qadi represented law and administrative organization.

Justice, the foundation of the state. Justice was important in the Ottoman Empire and was believed to be the foundation of the entire system.

Therefore, qadis independently carried out their duties. The Ottoman Empire was organized into a very complicated social structure because it was a large, multi-ethnic and multi-religious empire. Ottoman society was divided between Muslims and non-Muslims, with Muslims theoretically having a higher standing than Christians or Jews.

During the early years of Ottoman rule, a Sunni Turkish minority ruled over Author: Kallie Szczepanski. Read "Recording Procedures and Legal Culture In the Late Ottoman Shari'a Court Of Jaffa,Islamic Law and Society" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.The capital of the Ottoman Empire, Constantinople also had a unique culture, mainly because before Ottoman rule it had been the seat of both the Roman and Byzantine Empires.

The lifestyle in the Ottoman court in many aspects assembled ancient traditions of the Persian Shahs, but had many Greek and European influences.